New Faces in the Pantheon of Black Martyrs

With the recent shooting of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO, another face added to the pantheon of black martyrs. At one time this pantheon included icons such as Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Emmit Till, Medgar Evers, and even John and Robert Kennedy. The aforementioned individuals were assassinated for the cause racial inequality and injustice that was prevalent during the superficial age of American exceptionalism of the 20th century. While America was showing strength on the world stage, it was allowing its own citizens to be egregiously desecrated, beaten, and even lynch under the guise of national and ethnic pride.

For generations, the pantheon of black martyrs was on display in frames on the walls of many homes in the black community. Black civic and religious leaders would routinely speak the praises of those men and women we held in high esteem. We would see their likeness portrayed in dramatic expression throughout the year as we yearned for more like them to rise from the churches, ghettos, and streets and speak words of empowerment and liberation to us once more.
As the 21st century has entered its second decade, the faces of the pantheon of black martyrs have changed. We now see the faces of Tupac Shakur, Christopher “Notorious BIG” Simmons, Adamou Diallo, James “Jam Master Jay”Mizell, Sean Bell, Oscar Grant III, Trayvon Martin¸ Eric Garner, and now Michael Brown. These individuals were not on the front lines of civil rights protests or movements. They were not aligned with forces of evil intent on destroying white American privilege or power. These individuals were simple human beings who happen to have darker hued skin. Some of their deaths were the results of lifestyles that although on the edge, brought them notoriety and celebrity. Others were simply ordinary men, who were in the wrong place at the wrong time. Nonetheless, their faces have been added to the pantheon of black martyrs.

What makes the latter’s addition so significant? Perhaps it is the fact that those men were all martyred for a cause other than equality, justice, and peace. Perhaps it is because their faces reflect the myriad of justice disparities faced by people of color in these great United States. It is more likely that these men represent a hope for change that has not come. They represent the continual saga for freedom that has yet to be fully ascertained. These new faces bring to light the darkness of the past when some felt justified in taking the life of black men and women. Their deaths though deemed justifiable by some in law enforcement, are not justifiable for the cause of advancing humanity.

Their violent deaths reflect a deeper oppression beyond that of a supposed post-racial America. It reflects a generation of identity and leadership voids begging to be acknowledged and attended. It reflects a generational gap that has been largely ignored by our elders who have found success after their marches and protests of the 50’s and 60’s. It is the fury of a generation feeling slighted civically, socially, economically, and educationally. It is the pantheon that reflects the withdrawal of courageous men and women standing against oppression of disenfranchised blacks in urban areas once populated by soul businesses happily catering to their patrons with the knowledge that they were not only in business for themselves, but also for their people. It is the pantheon reflecting the age of the “race hustlers” gains fame and fortune at the expense of another black person’s violent demise at the hands of white and black people, with little to no regard for the value of human life.

So what then should be done in lieu of this knowledge? How do we honor the new faces in the pantheon without discrediting the sacrificial foundation of the founding ones? My suggestion is to empower our people to see beyond the temporary bliss of media hype on the plight of Blacks in America. We must rise as a phoenix from the ashes of self-contempt and victimization and become the sacred masters of our present and future. We must empower this new generation to see this pantheon of black martyrs as icons of a royal priesthood, a chosen race, children, and heirs of the Most Benevolent and Merciful Creator. We must present to them the pantheon as faces of humanity blessed of God. It is only when they see the faces in this pantheon of martyrs from that perspective that they will be emboldened to change the cycle of death into one of life, liberation, and love.

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Forty Years of Roe vs. Wade: The debate continues

Forty years has passed since the Supreme Court of the United States decided that a woman had the right to privacy under the 14th Amendment provided states balanced those rights and interests through proper regulations and protection of prenatal and the woman’s health. This decision shut out the backroom abortions many women were receiving that often resulted in physical harm to the fetus and woman and even sometimes death. Indeed while there is no desire to return to those days when abortions were performed in an unsanitary and unhealthy manner, there are still many who believe that abortion should altogether be banned in the United States. Like the pro or anti-slavery arguments of the 18th and 19th centuries, abortion presents the same ethos and pathos appeals for proponents on both sides of the issue.
Having been party to an abortion at one time, I am able to relate to the careless behavior that often leads to the decision to abort a fetus. For this writer, the issue is not so much about pro-life or pro-choice as it is about making better choices regarding sexual behavior. For many, this is as simple as being abstinent or celibate. For others, it is as serious as having a sexual addiction. For the religious zealots, abortion is about murder and breaking God’s command of not killing. For many others, it is about protecting a woman’s right to choose how and what she wishes to do with her body. Neither is a simple argument and the fallacies contained within both are dangerous enough to cause individuals to do horrible things in the name of their cause.
The debate is has been ongoing for the last 40 years and is certainly not likely to find resolution any time soon. The matter of ministering to those who have had or who are considering having an abortion is what is important to this writer. The entirety of the matter is being non-judgmental but loving and compassionate to all those affected by abortion. To God, life is precious and it should be to every human being. One cannot condone the murder of criminals and at the same time denounce the individual who has an abortion. That is unjust at the very least. If we are to be just, then we must also recognize that the religious liberties we experience today are only enhanced when we acknowledge that we live in a land where there is liberty and justice for all.

How Sweet to Hold

How sweet to hold a newborn baby, and feel the pride and joy it gives. But greater still, the calm assurance this child can face uncertain days, because He lives. William Gaither

The lines above hail from one of my favorite songs/hymns of the Christian church. Bill Gaither wrote the lyrics to “Because He Lives” under some very trying circumstances. Bill was recovering from an illness, his sister was experiencing a divorce, and the country was experiencing the civil unrest of the 1960’s. After the birth of their third child, the Gaithers rediscovered the power of Christ’s resurrection and Bill penned the lyrics to what is now one of the most beloved gospel songs of all time.

It is the second stanza of the song that is the most moving to me. I hear it sang throughout the year at various churches and it was recently at a revival service that I was preaching that the lyrics of the second stanza came alive to me. Although I have yet to have any children of my own, I have had the privilege of holding newborns for the sacrament of baptism/christening. Each time I hold a child and place the oil or water on them, I am captivated by the fact that this child has a future. I pray and pronounce a blessing over the child and the family and I imagine the child’s future even before it begins. This sacred event is a foreshadowing of the glory that God has for His children. As scripture proclaims in I John 3:2, “Beloved now are we the children of God, and it has not appeared as yet what we will be. We know that when He appears, we will be like Him, because we will see Him just as He is (New American Standard Bible, 1995).”

While countless believers sing this song and cherish the lyrics contained therein, few are willing to publicly stand for the life of the unborn. Because the issue of life has been politically tainted, the regard of the life of the unborn suffers. It is amazing how neglectful we are when it comes to the life of the unborn. If we believe that everyone has a purpose, and then we should give every fetus, baby, blob tissue, etc…, the right to fulfill it. We should give them the opportunity to experience the uncertainties of life.

There is a challenge we must be willing to undertake. We must have the courage to allow life for the unborn despite the circumstances that lead to unplanned pregnancies. When we as a church become more aware and compassionate for those involved in unplanned pregnancies, we will see a greater appreciation for the life of the unborn. We must acknowledge the reality of the sin of sexual immorality, embrace the shame and guilt that comes with it, and help all involved be free to live in the grace and mercy of God. Christ after all, was the individual who bore the shame and curse of dying on a cross for all to have life more abundantly. If we will continue to sing and believe that because He lives, we can face tomorrow, then we should with the same confidence allow the same for the unborn.

The CBC and the Admission of Guilt

While speaking at a town hall meeting at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday, US Representative Maxine Waters of California admitted that she along with other members of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) are tired of defending President Obama while he continues to neglect the needs and state of Black Americans. The “For the People” Jobs Initiative Tour is being sponsored by the CBC and includes US Reps Waters, Emmanuel Cleaver, the CBC president. Waters stated “Let me tell you why. We don‘t put pressure on the president because ya’ll love the president. You love the president. You’re very proud…to have a black man [in the White House] …First time in the history of the United States of America. If we go after the president too hard, you’re going after us.” Her remarks were mixed with cheers and jeers from the largely black audience at the job fair and town hall meeting hosted by the CBC. Mark Hicks of the Detroit News reported that the meeting turned heated at times as some residents debated government spending, bank lending, bipartisan bickering and the disproportionate effects of the economy on minorities.  She added that she couldn’t understand why Obama’s Midwest tour does not include any black communities. The unemployment rate for Blacks is just over 16% far above the national rate of just over 9%. This is even more difficult to accept as Obama will take another 10 day vacation in Martha’s Vineyard. It is sending a clear message that President Obama is not in touch with the people no matter how much the media tries to spin it.

From this reaction in Detroit, it is clear that many Black Americans are suffering from post Obama election syndrome. They were promised change, and they are receiving the change that only liberals in government can give. These people were looking for an administration that presented itself as one that had the interest of the people at heart but are now realizing that the Obama administration is only interested in maintaining the status quo of government entitlements and keeping people in more oppression than in previous presidential administrations. What they have received however are more disaffection, higher unemployment, and a greater disenfranchisement from the very politicians they continue to elect to serve them a better deal or handout.

Rep. Waters’ admission sheds light on two major things. The first is that the CBC has realized that even with a person of color in office, they are still left out of the major political game. They have spent the last three decades attempting to assimilate into a government that really does not want their full participation unless they compromise their integrity and values to draw votes for a partisan agenda. I know that may come across as harsh but it is the truth. I don’t want to slight what individual CBC members are doing for their constituents but overall, it is nothing more than a shell game for the Democrats. It is an admission that the CBC is guilty of being the real “Uncle Toms” and forfeiting the needs and concerns of the people for the votes and favors of the DNC. The CBC as an entity is guilty of being the real sell outs to their communities and their people.

The second thing is that black people are more educated about what’s really happening in the country politically than the Democratic party wants to admit. The DNC and CBC can no longer spew nonsensical rhetoric through black media outlets as they once could. Blacks are actually listening to conservative black voices like Thomas Sowell, Michelle Malkin and organizations like the Frederick Douglass Foundation. The CBC is guilty of going with the spin of a pro-Obama media that neglects the authenticity of counter thoughts among Black Americans. They are guilty of being cover-ups for the reality that is plaguing Black America. This cover up and defending of progressives and liberal lies is what has Maxine Waters and others like her tired. They are running out of excuses for Obama and his policies. They can no longer hold their frustration because they realize that
their livelihood is also at stake.

What is the conclusion to the matter? It is simply this. Black Americans must once again find their voice to speak gainst the oppression this administration is continuing. While Obama and his eam of media hype men attempt to promote a message of stability and rogressive change for Americans, Blacks must read through it and see the eality of a President carrying out a progressive liberal agenda that is not ully inclusive for people of color. The real change must occur in the polls as lacks turn their frustrations into votes. These votes cannot be for the same eople they must be for authentic change for Black Americans.
From The Detroit News: http://detnews.com/article/20110817/METRO01/108170367/Thousands-connect-with-employers-at-Detroit-fair#ixzz1VK98cn9r

Bin Laden’s Dead:Now What?

Millions of Americans watched Sunday night as President Obama addressed the nation with the news that Usama Bin Laden, the master mind of terror attacks around the world was killed during a US Special Forces covert operation at his million dollar compound in Pakistan. First, credit and congratulations are in order for President Obama’s decision as Commander in Chief, the military and CIA Intelligence leaders who spent months planning the operation. This is truly the epitome of the mourning, unity, and action following the terrorist acts of September 11, 2oo1. How Bin Laden evaded capture as long as he did while living in open secrecy for the past six years is a question that has many pundits, politiicians, and people wondering and waiting for more answers. While President George W. Bush began the action, President Obama has brought it to a close.

The question still remains-Now What?

We have been witness to civil unrest throughout the Middle East and the Muslim world for the past four months. We have watched as presumably horrible regimes have been outsted (with the exception of Libya’s Qaddafi). We are seeing countries such as Syria, Yemen, and Bahrain’s leaders recoup with violence on their own people. We are increased tension between Israel and Palestine. All of this unrest in the Middle East is pointing towards something that we must all be cognizant of. That something could be the end of the world as we know it.

The End or the Beginning?

We are witnessing a global crisis that has not been experienced since the beginning of the Second World War. Those familiar with history know that at the end of both World Wars, there was the establishment of a global united government movement. Post WWI was the League of Nations championed by President Woodrow Wilson. Post WWII was the establishment of the United Nations championed by President Franklin D Roosevelt. Neither of those men lived to see either organization to its full fruition, but the seeds they planted have deep roots in the world’s governance, military, economy, and diplomacy today. I am of the belief that in the upcoming future, we will see an even greater world government come into power that will exceed the expectations of both of its forerunners. This united world government will be something that most will rejoice to see, but could also lead to the decimation of the sovereignty of nations as we know it. It would literally be the end of the world as we know it.

How then should we prepare for this? Scripture shares much of what should be expected in the last days. Paul, addressing first century believers about the imminent return of Christ writes: “But concerning the times and the seasons, brethren, you have no need that I should write to you. For you yourselves know perfectly that the day of the Lord so comes as a thief in the night. For when they say, “Peace and safety!” then sudden destruction comes upon them, as labor pains upon a pregnant woman. And they shall not escape. But you, brethren, are not in darkness, so that this Day should overtake you as a thief. You are all sons of light and sons of the day. You are all sons of light and sons of the day. We are not of the night nor of darkness. (1 Thessalonians 5: 1-5) [NKJV] It is clear that he as others expected universal turmoil as a sign of preparation for Christ’s return. It is no different for believers today. We are witnessing a great shifting in the world-economically, governmentally, militarily, and in many other ways. We should be preparing to hear the words of peace that will beckon all to celebrate. It is when we hear these words or discern these signs that we should know that the time is drawing near and that Christ’s return is at hand.

Two millenia have passed since the world last saw the remnants of Christ’s promised return. The words of Jesus entreating his disciples of the last days are even more pertinent to those of us who are believers today: “Watch therefore, for you do not know what hour your Lord is coming. But know this that if the master of the house had known what hour the thief would come, he would have watched and not allowed his house to be broken into”. (Matthew 24:42-43) [NKJV]

DC Mayor Protests to Keep Money to Kill Babies

DC Mayor protests to keep money to kill babies
Washington DC is not short of a lively political atmosphere. It’s the seat of our nation’s government. It’s where all the movers and shakers gather to decide policy for we the people. It’s also a city that reeked with high crime and low educational performance. On Tuesday, April 12, 2011, DC’s mayor Vincent Gray and councilmen along with 41 others took to the streets to protest in from of the US Capitol. The city’s mayor and fellow protestors were all arrested for the protest but released later that day. Even though it may appear that they were protesting against continued infringment on city government, the reality is that it is all about the power to determine who should and should not live.

The major argument according to  Mayor Gray and others regards the recent budget proposal approved by Congress, in which DC would lose more of its autonomy but more particularly, lose funds used to pay for abortions for low income women, needle exchange program for drug addicts, and a school voucher program to assist students attend schools of their choice. According to an Associated Press article on Tuesday, “the city’s ability to spend money on abortions for low-income women has seesawed over the last two decades. When Democrats have controlled both houses of Congress and the presidency, in 1993 and 1994 and again in 2009 and 2010, the city has been able to spend its own money to pay for abortions for women on Medicaid.”  The average abortion in the DC area can cost between $300 and $500. While there is a hot debate in Congress regarding defunding programs like Planned Parenthood, DC’s city leaders are more concerned about keeping money to kill babies, than focusing on creating and supporting programs to empower women and all of its citizens to live an abundant and fulfilling life. They are showing what happens when values are displaced and replaced with shallow ideals and fiscal desires that continue to promote a sense of dependency on discretionary spending on unnecessary things.

While the group’s protest was noble, it also presents what’s wrong with our government. I am a strong pro-life advocate but even if I were not, I would not support any effort to use government funds for abortions of any kind. The fact that they are targeting low income women (mostly minorities) says that the DC city government has little to no concern for the life of the unborn. It is the belief that this very insistence on funding for abortions helps ensure that a woman’s right to an abortion is being upheld. That’s a lie from the pit of hell! Women should feel empowered when they give birth (despite how it was conceived) and should be able to choose to allow that life to continue and prosper. Throughout all of this, many also expressed great disappointment that President Obama is not stepping in and supporting their cause but is continuing to remain unengaged in their struggle.
Churches and Pastors in DC should stand up in protest. They should take the lead in demanding that DC’s leadership not seek any funds for abortion assistance. The citizens of Washington, DC should rise up in protest against their city leadership. The city’s leadership is demonstrating the very thing that is keeping its citizens in a bondage that is worse than slavery, Jim Crow, or any other system that oppressed people.

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS EVERYBODY’S RESPONSIBILITY

I came across this article in the Christian Recorder Online Magazine and decided to share it here. Blessings

YPD CORNER: SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IS EVERYBODY’S RESPONSIBILITY:

*Miacia F. Porter

Something about this year pushed and urged me to change my career goals. I didn’t want to be a journalist anymore, so I just stopped trying. I had lost all my drive to write, so I forced writer’s block upon myself. I neglected my pen and pad as if it was a century old building, whose frame and foundation had given way to the hardships of life. There was nothing left for me to say; at least not in print. I was mute, not in thought, but in sharing it.

I don’t know what caused this. I am not sure if it was the pressure of knowing that I was overworked, and stressed-out for a degree that might never hold any significant value to anyone outside of my family. Or, if it was the realization that I was 9 months away from another major milestone without a clear idea of what the future held? I am not sure if it was either, or; it possibly was a combination of both. Whatever it was, caused me to freeze right in the middle of time and I was immensely satisfied with my empty pages.

Then it hit me…I had used the fact that I no longer desired to be a journalist, to be a scapegoat to free me from something that had nothing to do with my career choice. Truth is I don’t want to be a journalist. However, the greater truth is I stopped writing because I no longer wanted the burden of social responsibility for the things I wrote.

So what is social responsibility? Wikipedia provided a great definition. According to this site, “social responsibility” is an ethical ideology or theory that an entity, be it an organization or individual, has an obligation to act or benefit the society at large. This responsibility can be passive, by avoiding engaging in socially harmful acts, or active by performing activities that directly advance social goals.

W. E. B. DuBois was a major activist for social responsibility, and as an individual greatly influenced by his work, I immediately reckoned with this concept. I wanted to be socially responsible for the welfare of my race and others. I knew this want and desire was wedded to my calling. I was eager to start life with this new belief, but somewhere along my journey I lost my zeal. I began to feel like it was becoming more and more challenging to believe, push, and motivate people; our people, who refuse the to see the light at the end  of the tunnel. Pessimism started to weigh down my optimism when I was trying to persuade others that they could achieve goals, and all they seem to decode was they could not.

Playing tug of war with ignorance, laziness, and the lack of drive can pushed me down, so much so, that even my own tears couldn’t convince me that the fatigue and mental anguish was worth the fight. And I am sure I am not the only one that has been at this point. I’m pretty sure this need to free ourselves from social responsibility is an attitude or desire that plagues our churches. I am certain of this because I am sure the church does not preach and teach like we use to because we don’t want the burden of social responsibility. We don’t witness and share because the responsibility of doing it, is just too demanding. Doing the right thing and going the extra mile just seems like too much responsibility in a world that does not demand that we go an extra mile. But it’s necessary for me to go the extra mile … I picked up my pen and pad again, not because I am a flawless wireless writer, but because I reckoned with the fact that the message is greater than the struggle. There is life embedded in the truths I speak, and I will not rob myself,  or anyone else from being inspired.

The same is true for our churches. There is so much life in our AME lineage. We are a life-line to our black community and we need to make sure this “breath of life” falls on every man, woman, boy, and girl in our communities. I had to write again and now I challenge preachers to preach again, Church School teachers to teach again, parishioners to witness again, all of us to share and love again, even in the mist of all of the dysfunction and economic problems because there is something we have been called to say that can free us all again.

*Miacia F. Porter is an Intern for The Christian Recorder and is a senior at Middle Tennessee State University